Wednesday, September 07, 2005

Sometimes It's OK Not to Be An Individual


Theresa Crout: The Human Helix

We are told in this country that we should be unique, that we are individuals moving forward according to our own free will, and that is how it is supposed to be.

Sometimes it's OK to be a part of something bigger. Sometimes it's OK to work in tandem, to not only care about your neighbor but to actual try to be your neighbor.

I just wanted to get that out this morning. Posted by Picasa

13 Comments:

At 9:06 AM, Blogger Lina said...

I agree completely. It is ok to be part of something bigger and its ok to Feel part of something bigger. Nothing wrong with a bit of soldarity.

 
At 10:43 AM, Blogger trisha said...

I'm with you.

 
At 1:18 PM, Blogger trisha said...

and i love that painting.

 
At 2:43 PM, Blogger she falters to rise said...

me too. My whole seminar talk is based around that painting. Someday, I'll show you how pretty it is.

 
At 3:38 PM, Blogger trisha said...

You will?!

 
At 3:40 PM, Blogger she falters to rise said...

of course, but not until it's finished.

 
At 3:50 PM, Blogger trisha said...

Hurry.

I am the loneliest girl in the world today.

 
At 5:51 PM, Blogger Raven Travillian said...

it is a wonderful painting. I'd love to get a chance to hear the talk that goes with it someday.

 
At 8:06 AM, Blogger she falters to rise said...

Maybe I'll do an e-conference. My talk is really, really boring since my research is all about DNA and tiny, itty bitty crap in the cell, but I do think the visuals are fun to watch. Sometime soon it will be ready...

Trisha, why are you so lonely today (well, I guess I mean yesterday)?

 
At 3:21 PM, Blogger trisha said...

I dunno. I woke up in a good mood, but R was in a crappy mood...and then he had therapy and then Chris and I had therapy...maybe just nerves.

I am happy, happ, HAPPY today, though.

Do you know much about Huntington's Disease (or Chorea, as we used to say, back in the day)? My aunt-in-law has it, and my older cousin is showing the signs.

 
At 3:32 PM, Blogger trisha said...

hellloooo............

 
At 12:55 PM, Blogger muse said...

That's a lovely way of expressing this, SFTR. :) Trust our resident scientist to come up with such a poetic image.

 
At 9:41 AM, Blogger she falters to rise said...

Oh crap, sorry Trisha. I spaced.

Huntington's is one of the few disorders that we can actually pinpoint to a specific genetic mutation (Huntingtin protein is mutated and forms toxi clumps in the brain). If you have the gene alteration, you have a 100% chance of developing the disease. If one parent has the mutation, the child has a 50/50 chance of getting the disease. Within the HD gene, there is a sequence that can occur in a series of repeats. The age of onset for HD appears to depend upon the number of repeats (someone with 40 repeats will have an earlier age of onset than someone with 4 repeats). It's been difficult to find treatments for the disorders--deep brain stimulation and neural tissue transplantation from fetal tissue has been proposed as possible therapies and some groups have been trying to develop a vaccine against the toxic proteins. There are a few mouse models of the disease that seem to mimic the human disease pretty well. Is there anything in particular you'd like to know?

 

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